Lecture Recital Series; The A - Z of Baroque Violin

Acclaimed violinist Alice Earll guides you and your audiences through the music of the Baroque era. From an introductory guide, discussing the social, historical and musical highlights, to a more in depth look at the history of virtuoso violin playing, or a look at how the celebrated baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach was inspired by dance. Whatever concert programme you choose, you’re guaranteed an evening of outstanding performance, informal discussion, drinks and fun in a relaxed atmosphere.  

Upcoming lecture recitals; Dancing with Bach for Ross Arts Appreciation Society 05.07.19, Bach and Beyond at St James’s, Piccadilly 07.08.19 and 3,2,1! Three Centuries, Two Performers, One Concert at Music at 22 Mansfield Street for Bob and Elisabeth Boas, 19.11.19, and at the Handel and Hendrix Museum, 21.11.19. All other recitals and concerts are listed here.

Alice gave a lecture on the history of virtuoso violinists up to the time of Bach, illustrating it with her own brilliant virtuoso playing. We came away with a geater background understanding and were amazed at her spell binding and expressive playing.
— Joe Skivington, Conductor
 
 
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Dancing with Bach

An exploration of the influence of dance on Baroque solo violin repertoire, from Biber to Bach. What role did dance play in Baroque society and how did this filter into the music of the period? This programme examines how the development of virtuosic solo violin writing coincided with the evolution of the dance suite, culminating with the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Music by Biber, Bach and Westhoff played on a historical instrument. 

Thank you so much for a stunning concert. It will remain with us for a long time! The last Chaconne was just breathtaking.
— Jill Davies, Davies Music
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Bach and Beyond

J.S. Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin are some of the most exceptional and best-known pieces for unaccompanied violin in today’s canon, but what was the inspiration behind these seminal works? Was Bach’s composition a singular work of genius or the pinnacle of a well-worn compositional path? Composers such as Biber and Westhoff blazed the trail as much as half a century before Bach has written his collection, yet little is known about them and their music is often overlooked. Discover the music that preceded J.S. Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin with music by Marini, Biber and Bach.

Finally, and in some ways the most important, was your willingness to share your love of music with us out here in the sticks! It is very kind of you to give up your time to entertain us, and I use the term “entertain” in its broadest sense.
— Martyn Davy, Audience Member
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Baroque for Beginners

An all-encompassing introductory lecture recital discussing the musical, cultural and artistic styles that came to define the baroque era. Taking a journey through Italy, Germany, France and England we explore the defining moments, people and pieces that shaped the development of music. From the importance of dance, the influence of the church and need to earn a living, we will also discover the journeys that have led to some of our most lovedmusical baroque works, such as Handel’s Messiah and J.S. Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin. Throughout the evening, violinist Alice Earll will perform well known works by Bach and Corelli and a few lesser known works by Biber and Matteis that shaped the musical landscape forever.

She played so sympathetically to the underpinning harmonies and there was so much light and shade, it was a real delight. One hears so much totally virtuosic Bach which shows little or no musical integrity. It is also so difficult to alternate between talking informatively and switching to playing and she brought that off very well. So lovely and actually quite rare, for a student one has known to blossom in the profession. I would certainly be pleased to hear her again.
— Vyvyan Lucas, Violinist/Violist